Author Topic: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.  (Read 8543 times)

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Offline KChock

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #20 on: December 18, 2009, 01:30:17 AM »
...lots of stuff can cut you/ gore you -and it doesn't have to be a big wound to put you in danger.  If you see spurting blood, you are in trouble.  I don't worry much about sharks.

Doc- thanks for explanation.

Offline cliffs2yak

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #21 on: December 18, 2009, 08:29:03 AM »
Doc,

I pray that I donít ever have to apply one; but, itís an important life saving skill to have.  Went through a few first aid training classes where my instructors did not have actual real life experiences applying a tourniquet.  But to receive advice from someone that has is extremely valuable.  Thanks bro!

Learned to make bandannas from shirts, bed sheets, and practically any absorbent material that you can fabricate with field tools.  And it was good to make a bunch of them since they have multiple uses in first aid applications.  And to have them  ready in a first aide kit or ditch bag will save time where seconds could mean life or death.  
A first aid certificate is a good thing to have on your safety checklist.  When you go through training, learning CPR, how to stop bleeding, and how to treat shock cannot be stressed enough.

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Shaka \ooo/

C2y
« Last Edit: December 18, 2009, 02:08:18 PM by cliffs2yak »

Offline yelloman

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2009, 08:51:06 AM »
ok.  i use the premade cat tourniquette, but with the bandana is pretty easy.  lets say that you lost half a leg or arm.  you would have the bandana rolled up, kinda like rambo did on his head, and thread the key ring through it.  If you happen to lose, or are bleeeding profulsely from an arm or leg, you take the bandana, and tie it as high up as you can. (armpit/crotch)  double tie it.  then slide wooden dowel between bandana and leg/arm.  twist the wooden dowel clockwise or counter clockwise....doesnt matter, till the bleeding stops.  this is a super effective tourniquette (according to experience)  when you get it as tight at you can, you will slide the end of the wooden dowel into the key ring, thus the dowel will stay in place.  The whole thing is probably  necessary, but after seeing what i have, i even have one in my truck.  it is an extremely effective way to save a life, that is threatened due to bleeding.

great tip Doc.

I think everyone carries some makeshift means to apply one

ring = surgeons end loop in a piece of mono/fluoro/braid
wooden dowel = plier handle
bandana = shirt/trunks/towel/hanky


Offline Doc Hall

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2009, 10:50:46 AM »
Yes, anything can work as long as you can make it tight enough.  has to be super tight, and it will hurt, but better than the alternative.  I'd be willing to teach a first aid, life saving class.  this is what i carry at all times.  they are $8.15 at  www.lifemedicalsupplier.com    they are designed so you can apply it with one arm.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2009, 10:53:59 AM by Doc Hall »
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Ahnkochee

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2009, 12:32:48 PM »
Quote
Super glue works great for closing smaller cuts, and Opelu mouths.
They make special super glue for wounds, real stuff is toxic & has some ill effect I can't remember. Also presumably works on Opelu.


Are you sure about that?  From what I gather Cyanoacrylate Adhesives were originally created for medical use especially for in the use of mending bone but also for suturing.  The only real risks I've read about is fumes when used in poorly ventilated room (irritates sensitive membranes), and the risk of bonding skin together.  Kayak very well vented, and we want to use to bond skin.  Everything is toxic if taken on large enough doses, just don't drink the stuff.  I've been working with this adhesive more than most usually buying in bulk bottles for work and hobby and in 30 years no dain bramage that I can detect.  ;)

Offline Doc Hall

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #25 on: December 18, 2009, 02:24:00 PM »
Main thing is make sure cut is clean and dry, then close and apply super glue.  just try not to get it inside the wound.  I've used it on numerous occasions lol.  Dermabond is the "medical" version of super glue.
Calling fishing a hobby is like calling brain surgery a job.

Ahnkochee

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #26 on: December 18, 2009, 04:00:02 PM »
Main thing is make sure cut is clean and dry, then close and apply super glue.  just try not to get it inside the wound.  I've used it on numerous occasions lol.  Dermabond is the "medical" version of super glue.

Amen, never put in the wound like a disinfectant, strictly topical.

Offline Living The Dream

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #27 on: December 18, 2009, 05:36:04 PM »
If you can stand looking past the advertisements, try this: http://www.wisegeek.com/can-i-really-use-superglue-to-close-my-wound.htm It's not great for you, it'll kill the skin where the medical type will slough off and you'll be good to go in a couple weeks. And the medical stuff has antibiotic properties. It sounds better than a sharp stick in the eye. Here's a link that discusses a medical journal article on it, including how it was applied (not squirt into the wound, just gluing the 'flap' of flesh back down). http://www.lubbockonline.com/news/052197/medical.htm

And if you pop the ring out of a guide you can do first aid on that too.
Studies say 60% of the time it works every time.

Offline Doc Hall

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2010, 06:29:28 AM »
Just wanted to refresh the topic, so others might not accidentely miss it.  all really great safety items to have on board.
Calling fishing a hobby is like calling brain surgery a job.

Offline GeofWA09

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #29 on: April 02, 2010, 05:43:35 PM »
doc great point with the strobe light. i have few issued items including an IR strobe 3 different flares and I thought i was the only one with quick clot just in case of a shark bite.

Offline Jonah and the Whale

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2010, 06:02:26 AM »
Just wondering how many of you guys carry a bilge pump with you? I've never had one on my kayak, but it always seemed like a good idea to have one, esp. if you're very far offshore.

Offline Uyeda Brothers

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #31 on: April 06, 2010, 06:19:15 AM »
Just wondering how many of you guys carry a bilge pump with you?
We have an electric bilge pump and I know a lot of people have the manual pump. It's a good idea to have something to bail water with...pump, scoop, cup, or whatever.

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Ahnkochee

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #32 on: April 06, 2010, 08:13:02 AM »
I used to use a home made bailer (plastic cooking oil jug with bottom cut off at angle) and a large sponge but recently upgraded to a Attwood Water Buster bilge pump.  It runs on 3 D batteries and is fully submersible (200 gph).  I made a U tube by bending a 1/2 inch PVC pipe after heating over stove burner (wait until wife not home  ;)) then adding a female hose fitting to one end.  This a attach to outlet of pump hose and hook onto gunwale (gunnel) before turning on pump, works great!


Offline Ken

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2010, 01:41:59 PM »
Solid post guys! Thanks! Looks like I have to gather a bit more safety gear before my maiden trip.  :)

This is the first thing I'm getting...

http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/5/SportsRec/Marine/MarineSafety/PRDOVR~0790041P/Marine%252BSafety%252BKit.jsp

In terms of kayaker leash (I assume it is to attach the kayaker to the kayak in the even of a huli), where should I attach the leash end to me as well as to the kayak?

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Offline cliffs2yak

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #34 on: April 07, 2010, 11:31:43 PM »
Ken,

I've been attaching my leash to one of my ankles and then to the front of the yak where my bow line tied to.  When I huli in waves, the kayak straightens out and I'm able to pull it through waves easier.  But there's other sites that recommend you remove your leash when making a surf entry.  Since my usual entry area may have swimmers or surfers in the area, and it was good for me remain leashed to my kayak to provide some control after a huli.  I just be sure to "dress/coil" the leash well before entry.

More can probably chime in with their methods...

c2y   

Offline GeofWA09

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #35 on: May 02, 2010, 08:32:26 PM »
I would leave it attached especially in a swim zone that way your gear and yak doesn't cause harm to others. also some other might say take it off because of a bad under tow that might send you back out with your boat. but if I were to get sucked back out i would love to be with my yak. so once again operator preference. Ya no leash for me.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2010, 05:39:23 PM by GeofWA09 »

Offline Azz Izz

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #36 on: May 03, 2010, 12:37:06 PM »
one thing you gotta keep in mind is that if you keep yourself strapped to the kayak and flip in the surf, you going get dragged possibly on and across dangerous reef and or on rocks. i wouldnt leash myself to the yak. i surfed a lot to have exprienced being dragged on the reef. scars to prove it too. and that was with just a board. imagine a kayak.......

Offline Rocket

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #37 on: May 05, 2010, 11:57:34 PM »
Attached in the wind
Unattached in the surf

Offline Boogie-D

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #38 on: May 06, 2010, 10:52:00 PM »
I attach my leash when coming in through rough surf. i don't want my kayak getting away from me and having to go swimming after it. I will move the leash to the stern for coming in.. i don't want it to the bow... this way if i huli my yak stays in front of my and i can control it as it drags me to safer water... sometime here the waves break pretty far from shore. that's just me and how i deal with it.

bilge pump: if you use a live well then the electric bilge pump can be converted to pump water from the yak... if you don't have a live well its a good idea to get a manual bilge or use that when not using a live well. a bucket will not cut it when sh@t hits the fan. I am going to buy a manual bilge pump to use for when i don't take my live well and for my clients...

I now always carry a back up paddle even if its just half a regular paddle.. i was out surfing with a client a while back and broke off both blades of my paddle while riding waves... also earlier that same day i broke my mirage drive.. i was out of everything to get in.. i had to have me client give me half of his paddle to make it back... never again.

its always good to be thinking about your safety and rethinking your gear and plan.. there is always room for improvement.



« Last Edit: May 07, 2010, 10:47:36 AM by Boogie-D »

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Offline KChock

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Re: Rockets Top Ten Safety must haves.
« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2010, 02:00:26 PM »
I attach my leash when coming in through rough surf. i don't want my kayak getting away from me and having to go swimming after it. I will move the leash to the stern for coming in.. i don't want it to the bow... this way if i huli my yak stays in front of my and i can control it as it drags me to safer water... sometime here the waves break pretty far from shore. that's just me and how i deal with it.

bilge pump: if you use a live well then the electric bilge pump can be converted to pump water from the yak... if you don't have a live well its a good idea to get a manual bilge or use that when not using a live well. a bucket will not cut it when sh@t hits the fan. I am going to buy a manual bilge pump to use for when i don't take my live well and for my clients...

I now always carry a back up paddle even if its just half a regular paddle.. i was out surfing with a client a while back and broke off both blades of my paddle while riding waves... also earlier that same day i broke my mirage drive.. i was out of everything to get in.. i had to have me client give me half of his paddle to make it back... never again.

its always good to be thinking about your safety and rethinking your gear and plan.. there is always room for improvement.





  I agree with your leash strategy, esp. for your area, but you might have to cut the boat loose if it gets really ugly (on N shore, it can), and swim.  BTW gang, wearing a life jacket in very large surf is one way to drown ...Boogie surely knows this.  RE: manual bilge - I think I looked into them a few times and saw lots of bad reviews on manual pump kine, except for the ones I couldn't afford.  Better check it out before you buy.  The  spare paddle is almost a requirement for those of us who solo -for me it's a matter of convincing the wife that I need TWO paddles (so far, no dice -but I would go for a cheap 2 pc aluminum when she's not looking).

 

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